Monday, September 16, 2013

It's Monday!

What I Finished and Reviewed Last Week

When lovely books stack up and stack up, it is always a happy feeling to get them read and reviewed. This was a very good week for reading and reviewing. Thirty-three reviews!





The Gravity of Birds
by Tracy Guzeman

Two sisters. One attractive man. And birds. Lots of birds.

Art. Lots of art.

A love story and a story of two sisters at odds with each other forced by...more







The Last Train to Zona Verde: My Ultimate African Safari
by Paul Theroux

When Paul Theroux says it’s his last train ride, I feel sad. I’ve traveled with Theroux across the east side of Africa, across Asia, and now down the...more









Food Rules: An Eater's Manual
written by Michael Pollan
illustrated by Maira Kalman

We don’t eat well here in America. Is that a surprise to you? I think not. 

And our terrible food choices contribute to our overall terrible health...more











 Mastering the Art of Soviet Cooking

 by Anya Von Bremzen 

 What better way to tell the story of Soviet life for the past one hundred years than  through the food of the time? Anya Von Bremzen brilliantly...more







Thursday's Child
by Sonya Hartnett

(I don’t think there is any way I can explain this amazing story. I will try, but I will fail.)

Harper Flute and her family struggle during Depression...more









Raising the Curve:

A Year Inside One of America's
45,000 Failing Public Schools

 Just the title sounds bleak. Oh my. Do we really have forty-five thousand failing public schools? Impossible task, really, isn’t it?

Or so it can seem....more






Chamelia and the New Kid in Class
by Ethan Long

Oh dear. What do you do when you are a quirky kid (Chamelia) and a new kid arrives who is just as quirky (the new kid in class)? Oh dear. It’s trouble...more









Violet Mackerel's Personal Space
by Anna Branford 

It is so lovely to find new small chapter books, just perfect for the children at my primary school. Violet Mackerel’s Personal Space is one of these....more








Sure Signs of Crazy
by Karen Harrington

Children's books have ventured into ground once held only by the occasional teen read. Poverty. Alcoholic parents. Dwarfism. Issues that were once tab...more











How Far Do You Love Me?
by Lulu Delacre

We always want to know, don’t we? And it’s such a tricky thing to measure. Delacre attempts to use geography to explain how much the parent loves the...more









Crankenstein
by Samantha Berger

The new hit book at my library. Our main character wakes up in the morning and he is awfully cranky. So cranky that he is, we learn, Crankenstein...more










Pi in the Sky
by Wendy Mass

I read this one right after I finished 
Henry Clark’s What We Found in the Sofa and How It Saved the World. 
Pi in the Sky is in the same sort of genre...more











Ling & Ting Share a Birthday
by Grace Lin

I have a Ling & Ting book on my library shelves, but today is the first day I actually sat down and read one. I like Ling & Ting. Gentle. Kind...more 











 Mr. Tiger Goes Wild
 by Peter Brown

Oh yes. I completely identify with Mr. Tiger. So buttoned up. In a stuffy, buttoned up world. And with a great, unexpected desire to go wild...more








You Were the First
by Patricia MacLachlan
and illustrated by Stephanie Graegin

The baby was the first for this mom and dad, the first to sleep in the basket, the first to cry and the first to smile, the first to laugh at the dog...more










Underwater Dogs:
Kids Edition
by Seth Casteel

Everybody loves dogs, so how about a book filled with great photos of dogs swimming underwater? Add some immensely readable text and I see a book that...more






The Baker's Dozen:
A Colonial American Tale
retold by Heather Forest
and illustrated by Susan Gaber

Everything you want in a good folktale: A greedy baker who learns his lesson, that only by being generous can one become prosperous. Just right for...more







The Woman Who Flummoxed the Fairies
retold by Heather Forest
and illustrated by Susan Gaber

A woman was known far and wide for making wonderful cakes, and word of her craft came to the fairies. Soon the fairies captured the woman and carried...more








Real Talk for Real Teachers
by Rafe Esquith

It's one thing to hear suggestions about becoming a better teacher from administrators who clearly became administrators in a desperate move to escape...more







The King with Dirty Feet
told by Rob Cleveland
and illustrated by Tom Wrenn

 We were just talking about folktales at my school library when, serendipitously, a bunch of wonderful new editions of old folktales arrived at my hous...more









Children of the Tipi: Life in the Buffalo Days
edited by Michael Oren Fitzgerald

Don’t you wonder what life was really like back in the days of the buffalo for Native Americans? I do. How better to learn about those days than photo...more 









 I Don't Know:  In Praise of Admitting Ignorance and  Doubt Except When You Shouldn't
 by Leah Hager Cohen

 I don't ever say I don't know. Maybe it's part of being a librarian or maybe it's my 
 supercilious personality, but I just don't say I don't know.  I'm...more








The First Drawing
by Mordicai Gerstein

How did it happen? Caldecott medalist Mordicai Gerstein hypothesizes a cave boy with stick and charcoal, who decides one day to share the things he se...more










Halloween Hustle
by Charlotte Gunnufson

A happy surprise: a self-published-at-Amazon goodie. Skeleton Halloween-hustles it to a big Halloween party, stopping from time-to-time to pick up his...more









The Earth Abides
by George R. Stewart

Instead of a real review, I’ve decided to post random comments from and about the story:

Economics professor: “The trouble you are expecting never happens...more






Awesome Dawson
by Chris Gall 

Oh my! I got this book way, way back last spring, when my library assistant was out with back trouble. I ended up hurriedly cataloging it and sending...more







Custer's Last Battle:

Red Hawk's Account of the Battle of Little Bighorn
by Paul Goble

Nobody illustrates Native American tales like Paul Goble. How wonderful it is to see this book, Goble’s first, back in print! The fictionalized story...more










Nighty-Night, Little Green Monster
by Ed Emberly

If I had a hundred copies of Go Away, Big Green Monster in my school library, they would all be checked out every week. Such is the love my school has...more








Angels
by Alexis York Lumbard

Angels watching over us is the theme of this little gift book. Beautiful. And comforting. 








A Canticle for Leibowitz
by Walter Miller Jr. 

When I was eighteen, I was crazy for what are now called post-apocalyptic novels. Read them constantly. Sought them out. Which was much trickier in the...more








Attachments
by Rainbow Rowell

I finished this book late last night and now I desperately want to read another Rainbow Rowell. This author can write about relationships. And can this...more









 The True Secret of Writing
 by Natalie Goldberg

Natalie Goldberg’s book, Writing Down the Bones, was the first book I read about writing. How easy this is! I thought. It set me on the road to daily...more










What We Found in the Couch and 

How It Saved the World
by Henry Clark

This review is easy; I really don’t have to tell you much more than the title. I can pretty much guarantee that if you like the title, you are gonna l...more









What are you reading this week?




It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? is where we share what we read this past week, what we hope to read this week…. and anything in between!  This is a great way to plan out your reading week and see what others are currently reading as well… you never know where that next “must read” book will come from! I love being a part of this and I hope you do too! As part of this weekly meme Book Journey loves to encourage you all to go and visit the others participating in this meme. 

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

Headed (Almost) West



Saturday Snapshot is hosted by West Metro Mommy ReadsTo participate in Saturday Snapshot: post a photo that you (or a friend or family member) have taken and then leave a direct link to your post in the Mister Linky at West Metro Mommy Reads.

For more wordless photos,

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Top Ten Books I Would Love To See as a Movie





I almost never see a wonderful book made into a wonderful movie.

I hesitate, then, to condemn a great book
to new life as a bad movie.

I'm afraid I have to say that
I'd rather keep my wonderful books
as wonderful books.

My short answer is none.

How about you?
Are there movies you would, bravely,
have made from your favorite books?




Re-posting, from April of 2011, 
a previous blog post with this prompt,
in its entirety.  Here's the original, with comments.


Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We'd love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

Each week we will post a new Top Ten list that one of our bloggers here at The Broke and the Bookish will answer. Everyone is welcome to join. All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND add your name to the Linky widget so that everyone can check out other bloggers lists! If you don't have a blog, just post your answers as a comment. Have fun with it! It's a fun way to get to know your fellow bloggers.

Monday, September 9, 2013

It's Monday! What Are You Reading?

What Came in the Mail Last Week

Whew!  If my books-in-the-mail don't slow down, I think my mailman is going to quit. Nine books this week! Whew!







Ling & Ting Share a Birthday
by Grace Lin













 Mr. Tiger Goes Wild
 by Peter Brown










You Were the First
by Patricia MacLachlan
and illustrated by Stephanie Graegin











Underwater Dogs:
Kids Edition
by Seth Casteel










The Baker's Dozen:
A Colonial American Tale
retold by Heather Forest
and illustrated by Susan Gaber











The Woman Who Flummoxed the Fairies
retold by Heather Forest
and illustrated by Susan Gaber










Teaching with Story:
Classroom Connections to Storytelling
by Margaret Read MacDonald, Jennifer MacDonald Whitman, and Nathaniel Forrest Whitman










The King with Dirty Feet
told by Rob Cleveland
and illustrated by Tom Wrenn











1492: New World Tales
Multicultural Stories from the Age of Exploration
collected and retold by Richard and Judy Dockrey Young








What are you reading this week?


Mailbox Monday was created by Marcia at The Printed Page. We share books that we found in our mailboxes last week.  

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? is where we share what we read this past week, what we hope to read this week…. and anything in between!  This is a great way to plan out your reading week and see what others are currently reading as well… you never know where that next “must read” book will come from! I love being a part of this and I hope you do too! As part of this weekly meme Book Journey loves to encourage you all to go and visit the others participating in this meme. 

Wednesday, September 4, 2013

A Weekend in Which I Sleep in a Covered Wagon and Crash into a Vulture


Yep, it's a covered wagon bed.
Surprisingly comfortable, too.

No photos of the vulture I crashed into.
The vulture was snacking on a dead critter
in the middle of Hwy. 29.
He flew up, when he saw my truck coming,
and, SMACK,
hit the windshield.

Saturday Snapshot is now hosted by West Metro Mommy ReadsTo participate in Saturday Snapshot: post a photo that you (or a friend or family member) have taken then leave a direct link to your post in the Mister Linky at West Metro Mommy Reads.

Tuesday, September 3, 2013

Best Assigned Reading?





 Top Ten Books That You Wish Were Taught In Schools

What books should be taught in schools?

As I learned this summer, something dies when a book is assigned. 

No assigned reading then. 

What about a list of great books to pick from?

Okay. I'll go for that. If we really want students to read books they connect with, if we really want students to read books that set them thinking, if we really want students to become lifelong readers...how about a list like this?

The House on Mango Street
The Fault in Our Stars
How to Be Perfect (poems)
Any Billy Collins (more poems)
Nickel and Dimed
I Am the Messenger
Bill Bryson's A Short History of Nearly Everything
The Arrival
High Tide in Tucson by Barbara Kingsolver
God Went to Beauty School
The Perks of Being a Wallflower
Marley and Me: Life and Love with the World's Worst Dog
Reading Lolita in Tehran
How Full is Your Bucket? Positive Strategies for Life and Work
The Van Gogh Cafe by Cynthia Rylant
The Hunger Games
My Name is Maria Isabel
Jeremy Fink and the Meaning of Life
Ender's Game
The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference
Wonder
The Happiness Project
Giants in the Earth
Dandelions by Eve Bunting
The Westing Game
If the World Were a Village
The Boy in the Striped Pajamas
Kathleen Krull's Lives of the Artists (or any in this series)
Never Cry Wolf
The Little Prince
Rotten Island by William Steig
Walk Two Moons
The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath
Holes by Louis Sachar
A Short Guide to a Happy Life by Anna Quindlen
Bud, Not Buddy
The Duck in the Gun by Joy Cowley
Skellig
Wolves by Emily Gravett
The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein
The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable
Anne of Green Gables
Of Mice and Men
The Color of Magic by Terry Pratchett
The 13 Clocks
Regarding the Fountain by Kate Klise
Love That Dog
The Case of the One-Eyed Killer Stud Horse by John R. Erickson
Stargirl
Harry Potter
The Invention of Hugo Cabret
Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein
Feathers by Jacqueline Woodson
The Phantom Tollbooth
The Tale of Despereaux
Hatchet
Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry
Material World by Peter Menzel
A Wrinkle in Time
How to Steal a Dog
Snow Treasure
A Tree Grows in Brooklyn
Not Quite What I Was Planning: Six-Word Memoirs
The Iron Man by Ted Hughes
The Last Lecture
The Last Shot by Darcy Frey (basketball; nonfiction)
The Good Earth
American Born Chinese
Because of Winn-Dixie
Pride & Prejudice 
The Book Thief
The Glass Bead Game
Eleanor & Park
The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind
Persepolis
The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-time Indian
Someday This Pain Will Be Useful to You
The Hobbit
Out of the Dust
1984
The Giver
14 Cows for America
To Kill a Mockingbird
Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close
The Glass Castle
Tadpole's Promise (I'd love to hear what teens would say about this one!) 
Fahrenheit 451
Uglies
Lord of the Flies
Speak
Poetry 180 (yet more poetry)
My Name is Asher Lev
Gift of the Magi
Bless Me, Ultima
The Diary of Anne Frank
Animal Farm
A Christmas Carol
Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes
The Lightning Thief
Firegirl....

What else? Do you have more good possible choices? But let's not assign everyone the same book any more. Please.

What do you think?  Should students be assigned a book to read? If so, what would you suggest?


Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We'd love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

Each week we will post a new Top Ten list that one of our bloggers here at The Broke and the Bookish will answer. Everyone is welcome to join. All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND add your name to the Linky widget so that everyone can check out other bloggers lists! If you don't have a blog, just post your answers as a comment. Have fun with it! It's a fun way to get to know your fellow bloggers.

Monday, September 2, 2013

Monday!

What I Read Last Week





Sure Signs of Crazy
by Karen Harrington

Review coming soon!







What Came in the Mail Last Week 





I Don't Know:  In Praise of Admitting Ignorance and Doubt Except When You Shouldn't
by Leah Hager Cohen

From Amazon: "Leah Hager Cohen explores why, so often, we attempt to hide our ignorance, and why, in so many different areas, we would be better off coming clean."




The First Drawing
by Mordicai Gerstein

From Amazon: "In The First Drawing, Caldecott Medal winner Mordicai Gerstein imagines the discovery of drawing...and inspires the young dreamers and artists of today."






Halloween Hustle
by Charlotte Gunnufson

From Amazon:  " Skeleton is dancing his way to a Halloween party—but as he grooves across town, he keeps stumbling, tumbling, and falling apart! Can Skeleton stay in one piece long enough to make it to the party?







The Last Camellia
by Sarah Jio

From Amazon:  "Flora, an amateur American botanist, is contracted by an international ring of flower thieves to infiltrate the household and acquire the coveted bloom. Her search is at once brightened by new love and threatened by her discovery of a series of ghastly crimes."





What are you reading this week?