Wednesday, November 28, 2018

Beautiful Quilts from the 2018 Houston International Quilt Festival (Part Two)

Here's My Favorite Quilts from the Houston International Quilt Show. But the quilt show has so much magnificent art that I couldn't just post about it once. 

Here are more quilts that I loved from this year's festival.


The beauty of the colors and shapes of some quilts was astonishing. 




A teacher made the next two quilts. To make them, she asked each of her students to bring her a piece of fabric to use in the quilts. Can you see the wild variety of fabrics in these two quilts? She said the fabrics would remind her of her students.




The husband of the quilter of the next piece works in a hair salon. The quilter incorporated real human hair into this quilt.



The quilter of this award-winning quilt is sitting to the right of her quilt. The quilt is like a painting.



Quilts don't have to be colorful to be beautiful.



Some of my favorites are very detailed.




Something about others reminds me of people I know.




I loved the quilt show.







Tuesday, November 27, 2018

Wonderful Families in Books


The holiday season reminds me of families. One of my favorite parts of books is seeing wonderful families in books. Here are some of my favorites.


Anne of Green Gables
Family: Anne with her adopted parents, sister and brother Marilla and Matthew Cuthbert

Anne's family is an unlikely family. Sister and brother Marilla and Matthew Cuthbert set out to adopt a boy to help on their farm, but somehow a red-headed and delightfully unpredictable girl shows up.



A Wrinkle in Time

Family: Meg Murry, her parents (though her father is missing for most of the book), her twin brothers Sandy and Dennys, and her little brother Charles Wallace

Meg is one of the most real teen characters I ever met when I was a pre-teen. Meg moans about how she doesn't fit in with her beautiful mother and her athletic twin brothers, but, in the process of going off to rescue her missing father, she bonds with her quirky and brilliant little brother as well as her future husband Calvin.



Little Women

Family: Four sisters---Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy, their mother, and their father (working far from home)

The March family lives in genteel poverty during the American Civil War, and the father is forced to work as a pastor in a distant location. Meg and Jo, the elder sisters, must work to support the family. The girls and their mother deeply love and care for each other.



To Kill a Mockingbird

Family: Sister and brother Scout and Jem, with their father Atticus Finch and their servant Calpurnia

Precocious Scout roams the town with her brother Jem. The two get great guidance and love from their father and the household servant Calpurnia.



Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry

Family: Cassie Logan and her three brothers Stacey, Christopher John, and Little Man; Cassie's parents Mama and Papa; and Cassie's grandmother Big Ma.

The Logan parents work hard to run their farm and both have additional jobs to help pay the taxes on the land. The black parents try to carefully teach their children to navigate the dangerous waters of racist 1920s Mississippi.



Because of Winn-Dixie

Family: Ten-year-old Opal Buloni, her father, The Preacher, their scruffy dog, Winn-Dixie and all their new friends---the librarian Miss Franny Block, grumpy neighbor Amanda Wilkinson, pet store owner Otis, recovering alcoholic Gloria Dump.

The Preacher has always been very sad since Opal's mother ran off. Opal and The Preacher move to a new town in Florida, and gradually make a new family with all the new people they meet there.



Henry Huggins
Family: Henry Huggins, his mom and dad, and his dog Ribsy

A lot of people love Ramona and her sister Beezus best of Beverly Cleary's characters, but I've always loved Henry Huggins. Henry is an only child and he manages to talk her mother into allowing him to bring home a stray dog he finds. I love the scene where Henry tries to take this mess of a dog on the city bus in a cardboard box.



All-of-a-Kind Family
Family: Five sisters---Ella, Henny, Sarah, Charlotte, and Gertie---and their immigrant parents

All-of-a-Kind Family is the story of a poor but close-knit Jewish family living in New York City at the turn of the twentieth century. The five sisters and their parents have many small adventures in the city and they all are drawn together closely by their strong Jewish faith.




Cheaper by the Dozen

Family: Efficiency experts Frank and Lillian Gilbreath, with their twelve kids

Cheaper by the Dozen is the true stories of efficiency experts Frank and Lillian Gilbreth and their family of twelve children. 



Mango, Abuela, and Me

Family: Mia, her parents, her grandmother Abuela, and their parrot Mango

Abuela comes to live with Mia and her parents in America, and Mia soon learns that Abuela doesn't know English. It's a difficult situation because Mia doesn't speak Spanish. Their parrot Mango somehow helps them work out the problems.



Last Stop on Market Street

Family: C.J. and his grandma Nana

Nana and C.J. go every Sunday after church to serve food in a soup kitchen. Nana patiently answers all C.J.'s questions about the things others have that they do not, all the while serving as a role model for helping others.







Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together. Each Tuesday That Artsy Reader Girl assigns a topic and then post her top ten list that fits that topic. You’re more than welcome to join her and create your own top ten (or 2, 5, 20, etc.) list as well. Feel free to put a unique spin on the topic to make it work for you! Please link back to That Artsy Reader Girl in your own post so that others know where to find more information.

Sunday, November 25, 2018

Nonfiction November: New to My TBR






Hooray, Nonfiction November is here! Nonfiction November is a month-long celebration of everything nonfiction. Each week, we’ll have a different prompt and a different host looking at different ideas about reading and loving nonfiction.



Week 5 (Nov. 26 to Nov. 30)
New to my TBR (Hosted by Katie at Doing Dewey)

It’s been a month full of amazing nonfiction books! 


Which new nonfiction books have you added to your TBR? 
Be sure to link back to the original blogger who posted about that book!

Here are books I've added this November.
I have added a huge number of new books. 
Thank you, all!

The Residence: Inside the Private World of the White House (Musings of a Literary Wanderer)

Sometimes Amazing Things Happen: Heartbreak and Hope on the Bellevue Hospital Psychiatric Prison Ward (Musings of a Literary Wanderer)

The Light Book of Lykke: The Danish Search for the World's Happiest People (Reading with Jade)

The Joy of Forest Bathing: The Mysterious Japanese Art of Shinrin-Yoku  (Reading with Jade)

Vincent and Theo (Sophisticated Dorkiness)


The Ghosts of the Tsunami (Brona's Books)
The Secret Life of Cows (Brona's Books)
Basho: The Complete Haiku (Brona's Books)

The Idiot Brain by Dean Burnett (Curiosity Killed the Bookworm)
Tamed: Ten Species that Tamed Our World (Curiosity Killed the Bookworm)

Fire Season: Field Notes from a Wilderness Lookout (Literary Mixtape)
John Muir and the Ice That Started a Fire (Literary Mixtape)

Bookworm: A Memoir of Childhood Reading by Lucy Mangan (Books, Please)

The Line Becomes a River: Dispatches from the Border by Francisco Cantu (Running 'N Reading)

The Trauma Cleaner: One Woman's Extraordinary Life in the Business of Death, Decay, and Disaster by Sarah Krasnostein (A Strong Belief in Wicker)
Any Ordinary Day by Leigh Sales (A Strong Belief in Wicker)

Beauty in the Broken Places: A Memoir of Love, Faith, and Resilience by Allison Pataki (Tina Says)
The Newcomers: Finding Refuge, Friendship, and Hope in an American Classroom by Helen Thorpe (Tina Says)

Forty Autumns: A Family's Story of Courage and Survival on Both Sides of the Berlin Wall by Nina Willner (Lakeside Musing)
I'd Rather Be Reading: The Delights and Dilemmas of the Reading Life by Anne Bogel (Lakeside Musing)

Meetings with Remarkable Manuscripts by Christopher de Hamel (Howling Frog)

The Silk Roads: A New History of the World (Brona's Books)
The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating (Brona's Books)
The Brain that Changes Itself (Brona's Books)
The Invention of Nature: The Adventures of Alexander von Humboldt, the Lost Hero of Science (Brona's Books)
The Porcelain Thief: Searching the Middle Kingdom for Buried China (Brona's Books)
The Brothers Gardeners: A Generation of Gentlemen Naturalists and the Birth of an Obsession (Brona's Books)

The Newcomers: Finding Refuge, Friendship, and Hope in an American Classroom (Based on a True Story)

Born a Crime by Trevor Noah (Lakeside Musing)
Tell Me More: Stories About the 12 Hardest Things I'm Learning to Say (Lakeside Musing)
Something from the Oven: Reinventing Dinner in 1950s America (Lakeside Musing)

Phantoms on the Bookshelves by Jacques Bonnet (Words and Peace)

Toms River: A Story of Science and Salvation by Dan Fagin (Doing Dewey Decimal)

Jell-O Girls: A Family Memoir by Allie Rowbottom (Melissa Firman)

Why We Sleep: The New Science of Sleep and Dreams by Matthew Walker (Booker Talk)

Hunting Eichmann: How a Band of Survivors and a Young Spy Agency Hunted Down the World's Most Notorious Nazi by Neal Bascom (Maphead's Book Blog)

Changing the Subject: Philosophy from Socrates to Adorno by Raymond Geuss (Typings)
Essayism by Brian Dillon (Typings)

American Way of Eating: Undercover at Walmart, Applebee's, Farm Fields, and the Dinner Table by Tracie McMillan (Tina Says)

Forty Autumns by Nina Willner (Sarah's Bookshelves)

Heating and Cooling: 52 Micro-Memoirs by Beth Ann Fennelly (Unruly Reader)



How about you? What nonfiction books have you added to your TBR?

Thursday, November 22, 2018

Time for Another Classics Club Spin! (Chunkster Edition)

It's time for another Classics Club Spin!


But wait. What, you might ask, is the Classics Club?

From the blog:
  • Choose 50+ classics you would like to read.
  • List them at your blog.
  • Choose a reading completion goal date up to five years in the future and note that date on your classics list of 50+ titles.
  • E-mail the moderators of this blog (theclassicsclubblog@gmail.com) with your list link and information and it will be posted on the Members Page.
  • Write about each title on your list as you finish reading it, and link it to your main list.
  • When you’ve written about every single title, let the Club know, and your name will be posted on the Wall of Honor.
If you haven't done this, do this first. Then you can get going with your reading by joining in for our Classics Club Spin.



What is the Classics Club Spin? Again, from the blog:

  • Go to your blog.
  • Pick twenty books that you’ve got left to read from your Classics Club List.
  • Post that list, numbered 1-20, on your blog before Tuesday, November 27, 2018.
  • We’ll announce a number from 1-20. 
  • Read that book by January 31, 2019. 
Yes, that's right. This is an extra special, super-dooper CHUNKSTER edition of the Classics Club Spin. We challenge you to fill this spin list with 20 of those HUGE books you’ve been putting off reading because you didn’t have enough time. With this spin we are giving you the time  – nearly 10 weeks in fact – to tackle one of those imposing tomes on your classics shelf.

Here is my list:
1. Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
2. Don Quixote by Miguel Cervantes
3. Moby-Dick by Herman Melville
4. Mythology by Edith Hamilton
5. Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson
6. Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
7. Don Quixote by Miguel Cervantes
8. Moby-Dick by Herman Melville
9. Mythology by Edith Hamilton
10. Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson
11. Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
12. Don Quixote by Miguel Cervantes
13. Moby-Dick by Herman Melville
14. Mythology by Edith Hamilton
15. Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson
16. Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
17. Don Quixote by Miguel Cervantes
18. Moby-Dick by Herman Melville
19. Mythology by Edith Hamilton
20. Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson

I've stacked the deck so that one of my five longest books will be chosen by the spinner.



UPDATE! UPDATE! UPDATE! UPDATE! UPDATE!

And the spinner has landed on...
So it's to be Anna Karenina for me!




Are you a Classic Clubber? Have you made your list? Leave a link in the comments if you have so I can see what you are picking.


Wednesday, November 21, 2018

Thankful

My husband said the other day, "This year has been the best year."

He is right.

So many big events happened this year for which I am grateful. My husband and I were able to retire from our jobs. We took an amazing trip to Europe. We celebrated forty years of marriage. We have a new grand baby on the way....


There are many other things I'm thankful for, too.

My great-nephew, Oliver, born at 25 weeks, weighing less than two pounds, 
came home after five months in the hospital and is thriving.


Our nephew came back from surgery to pitch in the World Series this year.

I get to enjoy the company of my almost-92-year-old dad, 
who still has his Navy uniform from 1945, 
and he, like it, is in mint condition.


Texas has gotten back on its feet after Hurricane Harvey.


My dislocated thumb has healed after I took a fall last spring.


I am filled with happiness when I think about my two wonderful sons, 
my two wonderful daughters-in-law, 
my wonderful granddaughter, and my wonderful grandson that's on the way..


Friends make life a rich experience.
I'm thankful for you all.


I'm thankful for my husband who, after forty years of marriage, 
can still surprise me and make me laugh.



For all of these things and many more I haven't listed, 
I am thankful.


What are you thankful for this year?

Tuesday, November 20, 2018

Ten Little Reminders to Be Thankful
























Feel free to take any of these and use them on our own blog or print them out and post them. I made them on Canva.




Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together. Each Tuesday That Artsy Reader Girl assigns a topic and then post her top ten list that fits that topic. You’re more than welcome to join her and create your own top ten (or 2, 5, 20, etc.) list as well. Feel free to put a unique spin on the topic to make it work for you! Please link back to That Artsy Reader Girl in your own post so that others know where to find more information.


Sunday, November 18, 2018

Nonfiction November: Reads Like Fiction





Hooray, Nonfiction November is here! Nonfiction November is a month-long celebration of everything nonfiction. Each week, we’ll have a different prompt and a different host looking at different ideas about reading and loving nonfiction.

Week 4 (Nov. 19 to Nov. 23)
Reads Like Fiction (Hosted by Rennie at What’s Nonfiction?)
Nonfiction books often get praised for how they stack up to fiction. Does it matter to you whether nonfiction reads like a novel? If it does, what gives it that fiction-like feeling? Does it depend on the topic, the writing, the use of certain literary elements and techniques? What are your favorite nonfiction recommendations that read like fiction? And if your nonfiction picks could never be mistaken for novels, what do you love about the differences?

Does it matter to you whether nonfiction reads like a novel? If it does, what gives it that fiction-like feeling? Does it depend on the topic, the writing, the use of certain literary elements and techniques?

Nonfiction doesn't have to read like a novel for me to enjoy it, but my favorite nonfiction books do. In nonfiction, the most important thing is truth. But the second most important thing is meaning, and I generally need story to get meaning.

And if your nonfiction picks could never be mistaken for novels, what do you love about the differences?

I love to read through books of information, like encyclopedias and dictionaries; no one would mistake an encyclopedia or a dictionary for a novel. What I love about reference books like these is the feeling that all the important things have been collected and shared in one place. 

What are your favorite nonfiction recommendations that read like fiction? 

The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great MigrationUnbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience and RedemptionEncyclopedia of an Ordinary LifeThe Last Shot: City Streets, Basketball DreamsThe Nine: Inside the Secret World of the Supreme CourtGod Save Texas: A Journey Into the Soul of the Lone Star StateThe Glass CastleLeonardo da VinciAntifragile: Things That Gain from DisorderWoman: An Intimate GeographyThe Roads to Sata: A 2000-Mile Walk Through JapanThe Year of Living Biblically: One Man's Humble Quest to Follow the Bible as Literally as Possible

For Adults:
God Save Texas: A Journey into the Soul of the Lone Star State by Lawrence Wright
The Nine: Inside the Secret World of the Supreme Court by Jeffrey Toobin
LeRoad Trip: A Traveler's Journal of Love and France by Vivian Swift
The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration by Isabel Wilkerson
Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Resistance by Laura Hillenbrand
Traveling Mercies: Some Thoughts on Faith by Anne Lamott
Encyclopedia of an Ordinary Life by Amy Krouse Rosenthal
The Last Shot: City Streets, Basketball Dreams by Darcy Frey
The Glass Castle by Jeanette Walls
Leonardo da Vinci by Walter Isaacson
Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
Woman: An Intimate Geography by Natalie Angier
The Roads to Sata: A 2,000 Mile Walk Through Japan by Alan Booth
The Year of Living Biblically: One Man's Humble Quest to Follow the Bible as Literally as Possible by A.J. Jacobs
A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson

And let's add two more that I finished this week:
The Library Book by Susan Orlean
The American Wolf: A True Story of Survival and Obsession in the West by Nate Blakeslee


Herstory: 50 Women and Girls Who Shook Up the WorldRadioactive: Marie and Pierre Curie, A Tale of Love and FalloutRedwoodsThe Fantastic Undersea Life of Jacques CousteauOne Beetle Too Many: The Extraordinary Adventures of Charles DarwinBird Talk: What Birds Are Saying and WhyLet's Hatch Chicks!: A Day-by-Day Chick Hatching Guide for KidsDolphin Baby!Ella: Queen of JazzSchomburg: The Man Who Built a LibraryIf the World Were a Village: A Book about the World's PeopleLives of the Artists: Masterpieces, Messes (and What the Neighbors Thought)

For Children:
Herstory: 50 Women and Girls Who Shook Up the World by Katherine Halligan
Radioactive: Marie and Pierre Curie, a Tale of Love and Fallout
Redwoods by Jason Chin
The Fantastic Undersea Life of Jacques Cousteau by Dan Yaccarino
One Beetle Too Many: The Extraordinary Adventures of Charles Darwin by Kathryn Lasky
Bird Talk: What Birds are Saying and Why by Lita Judge
Let's Hatch Chicks: A Day-to-Day Chick Hatching Guide for Kids by Lisa Steele
Dolphin Baby! by Nicola Davies
Ella: Queen of Jazz by Helen Hancocks
Schomberg: The Man Who Built a Library by Carole Boston Weatherford
If the World Were a Village: A Book about the World's People by David J. Smith
Lives of the Artists: Masterpieces, Messes by Kathleen Krull