Tuesday, January 21, 2020

The Ten Most Recent Additions to My Bookshelf

My birthday in November and Christmas in December filled my bookshelves:


Why You Should Read Children's Books Even Though You Are So Old and Wise by Katherine Rundell

"Katherine Rundell - Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford, and prize-winning author of five novels for children - explores how children's books ignite, and can re-ignite, the imagination; how children's fiction, with its unabashed emotion and playfulness, can awaken old hungers and create new perspectives on the world."



Hint Fiction: An Anthology of Stories in 25 Words or Fewer edited by Robert Swartwood

"The stories in this collection run the gamut from playful to tragic, conservative to experimental, but they all have one thing in common: they are no more than 25 words long. Robert Swartwood was inspired by Ernest Hemingway's possibly apocryphal six-word story―"For Sale: baby shoes, never worn"―to foster the writing of these incredibly short-short stories. He termed them "hint fiction" because the few chosen words suggest a larger, more complex chain of events. Spare and evocative, these stories prove that a brilliantly honed narrative can be as startling and powerful as a story of traditional length. The 125 gemlike stories in this collection come from such best-selling and award-winning authors as Joyce Carol Oates, Ha Jin, Peter Straub, and James Frey, as well as emerging writers."



Heating & Cooling: 52 Micro-Memoirs by Beth Ann Fennelly

"The 52 micro-memoirs in genre-defying Heating & Cooling offer bright glimpses into a richly lived life, combining the compression of poetry with the truth-telling of nonfiction into one heartfelt, celebratory book. Alternatingly wistful and wry, ranging from childhood recollections to quirky cultural observations, these micro-memoirs build on one another to shape a life from unexpectedly illuminating moments."



Booked: A Traveler's Guide to Literary Locations Around the World by Richard Kreitner

"A must-have for every fan of literature, Booked inspires readers to follow in their favorite characters footsteps by visiting the real-life locations portrayed in beloved novels including the Monroeville, Alabama courthouse in To Kill a Mockingbird, Chatsworth House, the inspiration for Pemberley in Pride and Prejudice, and the Kyoto Bridge from Memoirs of a Geisha. The full-color photographs throughout reveal the settings readers have imagined again and again in their favorite books.

Organized by regions all around the world, author Richard Kreitner explains the importance of each literary landmark including the connection to the author and novel, cultural significance, historical information, and little-known facts about the location. He also includes travel advice like addresses and must-see spots."



The Pie Book: Over 400 Classic Recipes by Louis P. De Gouy

"From simple cherry pies to hearty mince meats, luscious custards, and elegant chiffons, master chef Louis P. De Gouy presents more than 400 tasty pie recipes. De Gouy, a founder of Gourmet magazine, is an expert at concise instruction. In addition to his carefully chosen recipes, he offers advice on flour selection, fruit preparation, and baking procedures, including the secrets to turning out a flaky, golden-brown crust every time."



The Tiny Book of Tiny Stories, Volume 2 by Joseph Gordon-Levitt

"Actor Joseph Gordon-Levitt (The Dark Knight RisesInceptionLooper500 Days of Summer) made a big splash with The Tiny Book of Tiny Stories—so now he’s back with volume 2! One of the most ingenious and successful projects to come out of Gordon-Levitt's online creative coalition hitRECord—an international collaboration of artists and writers—The Tiny Book of Tiny Stories: Volume 2 offers more quirky, delightfully small, ingeniously illustrated haiku-like tales, proving once more that the universe isn’t made of atoms; it’s made of tiny stories. The best things do come in small packages."



Notes from a Public Typewriter edited by Michael Gustafson

"When Michael Gustafson and his wife Hilary opened Literati Bookstore in Ann Arbor, Michigan, they put out a typewriter for anyone to use. They had no idea what to expect. Would people ask metaphysical questions? Write mean things? Pour their souls onto the page? Yes, no, and did they ever.

Every day, people of all ages sit down at the public typewriter. Children perch atop grandparents' knees, both sets of hands hovering above the metal keys: I LOVE YOU. Others walk in alone on Friday nights and confess their hopes: I will find someone someday. And some leave funny asides for the next person who sits down: I dislike people, misanthropes, irony, and ellipses ... and lists too.

In Notes from a Public Typewriter, Michael and designer Oliver Uberti have combined their favorite notes with essays and photos to create an ode to community and the written word that will surprise, delight, and inspire."



(Not Quite) Mastering the Art of French Living by Mark Greenside

"Despite the two decades that have passed since Greenside’s snap decision to buy a house in Brittany and begin a bi-continental life, the quirks of French living still manage to confound him. Continuing the journey begun in his 2009 memoir about beginning life in France, (Not Quite) Mastering the Art of French Living details Greenside’s daily adventures in his adopted French home, where the simplest tasks are never straightforward but always end in a great story. Through some hits and lots of misses, he learns the rules of engagement, how he gets what he needs—which is not necessarily what he thinks he wants—and how to be grateful and thankful when (especially when) he fails, which is more often than he can believe."



300 Arguments by Sarah Manguso

"Thank heaven I don’t have my friends’ problems. But sometimes I notice an expression on one of their faces that I recognize as secret gratitude.

I read sad stories to inoculate myself against grief. I watch action movies to identify with the quick-witted heroes. Both the same fantasy: I’ll escape the worst of it.
―from 300 Arguments
A “Proustian minimalist on the order of Lydia Davis” (Kirkus Reviews), Sarah Manguso is one of the finest literary artists at work today. To read her work is to witness acrobatic acts of compression in the service of extraordinary psychological and spiritual insight.
300 Arguments, a foray into the frontier of contemporary nonfiction writing, is at first glance a group of unrelated aphorisms. But, as in the work of David Markson, the pieces reveal themselves as a masterful arrangement that steadily gathers power. Manguso’s arguments about desire, ambition, relationships, and failure are pithy, unsentimental, and defiant, and they add up to an unexpected and renegade wisdom literature."


Around the World in 80 Trees by Jonathan Drori

"In Around the World in 80 Trees, Jonathan Drori uses plant science to illuminate how trees play a role in every part of human life, from the romantic to the regrettable. From the trees of Britain, to India's sacred banyan tree, they offer us sanctuary and inspiration – not to mention the raw materials for everything from aspirin to maple syrup.

Stops on the trip include the lime trees of Berlin's Unter den Linden boulevard, which intoxicate amorous Germans and hungry bees alike, the swankiest streets in nineteenth–century London, which were paved with Australian eucalyptus wood, and the redwood forests of California, where the secret to the trees' soaring heights can be found in the properties of the tiniest drops of water.

Each of these strange and true tales – populated by self–mummifying monks, tree–climbing goats and ever–so–slightly radioactive nuts – is illustrated by Lucille Clerc, taking the reader on a journey that is as informative as it is beautiful. The book combines history, science and a wealth of quirky detail – there should be surprises for everyone."




Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together. Each Tuesday That Artsy Reader Girl assigns a topic and then post her top ten list that fits that topic. You’re more than welcome to join her and create your own top ten (or 2, 5, 20, etc.) list as well. Feel free to put a unique spin on the topic to make it work for you! Please link back to That Artsy Reader Girl in your own post so that others know where to find more information.

37 comments:

  1. Nice! Those are all new to me ones! I hope you enjoy them all!

    Here's my Tuesday Post

    Have a GREAT day!

    Old Follower :)

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  2. I love the idea of all these anthologies of very short stories! I’m always impressed by what some writers can do with such few words.

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    1. So much more powerful when the writer only uses a few words.

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  3. I need to read these.
    www.rsrue.blogspot.com

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  4. You find the most interesting books! I love the Tiny Book series.

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  5. These all look so interesting! Especially the Literary Locations one! 😊

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    1. I need to read up on the Paris locations before I leave next Monday. Thanks for the reminder.

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  6. That Hint Fiction looks intriguing. I do a 6-word memoir with my writing students-- they have trouble keeping to 6 words--I bet they'd love 25!

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    1. It might be fun to shake things up and give them that option sometimes.

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  7. That quilt in the background looks so cosy! And what an interesting set of books��

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    1. Looks like it chose my old blogspot account to post the comment 😊

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  8. That looks like a nice selection of books. I hope you enjoy them all.

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  9. I'll enjoy reading your thoughts about Notes on a Public Typewriter.

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  10. What a great variety of books you've gotten recently! It's got me thinking about the ones I've just added.

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  11. Like my list (https://wordsandpeace.com/2020/01/21/the-ten-most-recent-additions-to-my-2020-bookshelf/), yours seem to reflect well your current focuses in life. I'm going to check Booked at my library, thanks!

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  12. Looks like a lot of great books, I'm especially interested in the first one you listed. I love children's books. And great quilt!

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  13. I'm getting Around the World in 80 Trees. Thanks for telling me about it. I want to tour the world looking at the lest trees. Wouldn't that be fun? My husband doesn't think so. Ha! <a href="https://headfullofbooks.blogspot.com/2020/01/best-nonfiction-reads-of-past-decade.htNonfiction titles of the past decade</>

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  14. I hope you enjoy all of these. (Not Quite) Mastering the Art of French Living sounds like a good one. :)

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  15. Oh, I've missed out on The Tiny Book of Tiny Stories Vol 1 and 2. I've never been able to find it at my library and I wasn't quite ready to purchase it. Since it's been a while now, I'm going to try and look for it again.

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  16. i haven't read any of these books, but i'll check them out! hope you enjoy them :)

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  17. Interesting collection of books. Enjoy them!

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  18. I know for sure that I will be looking for all of these 10 books on your list and adding them to my bookshelf.. they all look like books I will love.

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  19. Nice collection,I like the Pie Book, love pies

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    1. It's an old book about pies, so I think it will have some things I wouldn't find in a modern book.

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  20. Some wonderful choices. How will you decide which to read first??

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    1. Trees is such a beautiful book that I had to read it first.

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  21. The trees book looks so interesting!

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  22. What an interesting set of books! I have a similar shelf-filling season, but my birthday is 21 January!

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