Tuesday, February 4, 2020

In Other Words: A Language Lover's Guide to the Most Intriguing Words Around the World (Deuxième Partie)


In Other Words: A Language Lover's Guide to the Most Intriguing Words Around the World
written by Christopher J. Moore

"Take a trip around the world of words and unlock the meaning of some of the most insightful, intriguing, and satisfying expressions on the planet, for which there are no English equivalents."

Christopher J. Moore closely studies all the languages of the world to find the most fascinating words and expressions and shares them with us in this book. Moore finds words in French, German, Italian, and other Western European languages; Czech, Russian, and other Eastern European languages; Yiddish; Nordic languages including Danish, Norwegian, and Icelandic; the Middle Eastern languages of Arabic, Turkish, and Persian; African languages; Asian languages; ancient and classical languages; indigenous languages; and Creole and Pidgen languages. This is the kind of book that we who love words could read for a year.

While I'm off in Paris for a few weeks, I thought it would be fun to share some of the most fascinating French words from the book, and to use my nascent photography skills to illustrate each.

Here are a few of my illustrated words:





19 comments:

  1. Last one seemed a little harsh to me but then I have never come across those words before

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    1. I think it might sound harsh the first time you look at it, but it seems like a word that gets closer to truth when you look at it again.

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  2. Looks like King Neptune got stuck in the coal cellar!

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  3. Beautiful words. I love the last word the most. Loved the meaning. I am trying to think of a word in my mothertongue that would have similar meaning.

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    1. I'm pretty sure we do not have a similar word in English.

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  4. The word "jolie" can be used for a lot of things and not only for a feminine beauty. You can have jolie cups, jolie furniture, a jolie house etc. With laid, laide it's different this can be also used for or what we think is good, moral, honest: A pretty ugly (laid) story (according to the "Larousse" ! Must be interesting to read the book. I have worked as a translator all my life in German, French, English and Italian, and it's often very difficult to find the real right word !

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  5. Must be interesting to read the book. Have a good time.

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  6. I love this feature and was familiar with these phrases. Grapes and terroir are used in beer a little now too.

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  7. I've never come across any of those words before.

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  8. So cool. With a winemaking husband, I know terrior. I've read béte noire in books, but never quite got it (nor can I find the right diacritical mark for it!). And the last one is new to me, and a fascinating concept. It's how I felt about my mom's hands--gnarled with age and work, and so beautiful in their "imperfection." Keep these words coming!

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    1. The last word almost seems Japanese to me, a word that is similar to wabi-sabi.

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  9. I must read this book, I love words and learning how they came to be, where they come from, how they've changed, all of it! Thanks for bringing this one to my attention.

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